White Day in Kawasaki & Yokohama

Valentine’s Day in Japan is a day where girls give chocolate and other baked confectionaries to their significant other or the guy they’re crushing on.  But what do girls get out of it, you might ask?  A month later, on March 14th, is when guys are supposed to offer up something in return.  That usually means some sweets they’ve bought from a department store or a hot date.

Personally I prefer the American style way of celebrating Valentine’s Day, but because Mr. J and I didn’t have any time to spend the day of, we both had the weekend after White Day off, and so Mr. J promised to take me out somewhere then.

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Getting Your Glam On: Trying Out Some Aromatherapy

© J // Washing Rice Blog

© J // Washing Rice Blog

Last weekend a friend of mine invited me to join her and some other friends at a local cafe by her house for an aromatherapy seminar.  The cafe a spokesperson from DoTerra to lead the course,  which one of the ladies joined as a buyer/salesperson.  It was kind of like the aromatherapy version of a tupperware party.  😉

I pretty much went in on zero, though.  Last year Mr. J bought us a cheap mist humidifier and some scented oils that we use with it, and I’ve really enjoyed the few times I’ve had the chance to get an aromatherapy massage.  Still it was something new and fun to try, and I came out a little more knowledgeable about the aromatherapy market in Japan, and how to choose and combine different oils.

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Medical Stuff: Avoiding Colds & Finding a Doctor

It’s been insanely windy this week, with the spring wind coming in strong.  The sudden weather change can be pretty rough for some, and even worse for those that suffer from kafunsho (pollen allergies), or what many Japanese refer to as hay fever. Find yourself coming down with something or trying to navigate Japan’s somewhat-confusing medical system?  This post might be able to help.

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Graduation Ceremonies

Graduation season is here!  If you’re new to the way Japan works, the school and fiscal year begins in April and ends in March, so most graduation ceremonies occur on a Saturday at the beginning of/mid-March.

If you ever become an ALT, or are dispatched to teach at any kind of public or private education institution, chances are you’ll be invited to at least one graduation ceremony.  For the most part, they’re your average affair, but Japan does a put a few of its own twists on the occasion.

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